2017 Inception Award | Future Housing

 

As an intentional community development, the projects primary focus addresses concern around affordability of New Zealand housing while aiming to increasing liveability and strengthening community. Through a research-led design process, a diverse range of dwelling arrangements was developed to facilitate safe, affordable and high-quality living. The housing clusters are configurable for small to large families and co-housing. These diverse spatial arrangements present a social architecture to enhance live-work lifestyles that focus on strengthening cultural identity practices. Common areas on site afford opportunities for place making through cultural events as a cultural strategy where residents strengthen relationships with broader community. The cluster’s interiors emphasise relaxing private spaces for residents. Use of natural material aesthetics provoke spacious and healthy living environments brought to life by careful daylighting penetrations that closely reflect exterior form. Ecologically designed, passive house construction ensures low maintenance costs and long service life.

Future Housing
As an intentional community development, the projects primary focus addresses concern around affordability of New Zealand housing while aiming to increasing liveability and strengthening community. Through a research-led design process, a diverse range of dwelling arrangements was developed to facilitate safe, affordable and high-quality living. The housing clusters are configurable for small to large families and co-housing. These diverse spatial arrangements present a social architecture to enhance live-work lifestyles that focus on strengthening cultural identity practices. Common areas on site afford opportunities for place making through cultural events as a cultural strategy where residents strengthen relationships with broader community. The cluster’s interiors emphasise relaxing private spaces for residents. Use of natural material aesthetics provoke spacious and healthy living environments brought to life by careful daylighting penetrations that closely reflect exterior form. Ecologically designed, passive house construction ensures low maintenance costs and long service life.

Developing an intentional community provides many exciting opportunities for exploring social sustainability and alternative models for living. The proposed Castor Cresent ‘eco-village’ project evolved through a fairly divergent research-led design process. Phase One of the project consisted of conceptual development and master plan. Foundational reading was key to identifying sound design ethos. Much of Sim Van Der Ryn’s ecological design philosophy was adopted into this process. Ryn’s Solar Living Centre in California provided great precedence and a starting point for further conceptual enquiry. It became clear that environmental aspects were key to achieving greater health for users thus natural building materials defined the housing construction.
Phase Two was orientated around interiors. Providing safe and comfortable living spaces that promote users health and well-being remained a central focus. Questions raised during early design stages facilitated new research enquiry, these outcomes were facilitated and resolved through further reading. Christopher Alexander’s A Pattern Language became a valuable resource, aiding refined design decisions that embodied fundamental methods and universal social values. Alexander’s patterns were carefully consolidated with existing conceptual elements. The results spatialised as simple interior compositions.